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Lunchtime Lectures

Tickets: £4. Lectures last approximately 45 minutes with time for questions.

Free entry plus guest to RCS fellows and members, free entry to RCS affiliates, medical students and Hunterian Society members (please call to reserve places). Free place for companions accompanying disabled visitors.

Booking is essential on 020 7869 6568 (NGT: 018001 020 7869 6568)

Live speech-to-text for deaf and hard of hearing visitors delivered by STAGETEXT.

 

Tuesday 6 September, 1pm
A Surprising Letter from Turkey: Lady Mary Wortley Montagu fights back against smallpox
Professor Gareth Williams
Gareth Williams tells the colourful story of how variolation against smallpox was brought to England, seized the medical and public imagination and spread throughout Europe during the century before Edward Jenner's birth.  The key players included Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, who both delighted and scandalised high society; Caroline of Ansbach, Princess of Wales and an assortment of top doctors.


Tuesday 18 October, 1pm
Healing Through Kindness: Commemorating the centenary of the Royal Masonic Hospital
Susan Snell
Conceived as a nursing home for freemasons before World War I, in its time the Royal Masonic Hospital was the largest private medical facility in England. The Hospital treated thousands of servicemen during both world wars and its surgeons developed techniques that influenced NHS treatments. Located at Ravenscourt Park from 1931, the Hospital’s striking architecture won awards and its nurse training was highly-regarded. This presentation will reveal the Hospital’s fascinating history using images from archives, photographs and films.


Tuesday 8 November, 1pm
An Anatomical Whodunnit? The Tiger Bronzes by Michelangelo
Professor Peter Abrahams
Girton Life Fellow and Clinical Anatomist at Warwick Medical School, Professor Peter Abrahams was one of the key researchers behind the revelation of the attribution of two bronze statues of nude males riding ferocious panthers. Working with other international experts led by the University of Cambridge and the Fitzwilliam Museum, he gathered evidence which suggests that these two statues are the only surviving Michelangelo bronzes in the world.
 

Tuesday 6 December, 1pm
A Change of Heart: The history and current status of heart transplantation
Sir Terence English
Christiaan Barnard performed the first human heart transplant in Cape Town in 1967. However, it was the American Norman Shumway who deserves credit for establishing it as a practical treatment for patients with advanced heart failure. The British programme of transplantation was started at Papworth Hospital in 1979 and with the advent of better drugs for treating rejection; Papworth became one of the pre-eminent centres for heart and lung transplantation. Sir Terence English will examine the history of this life-changing procedure through to its current practice today.

 

Tickets: £4. Lectures last approximately 45 minutes with time for questions.

Free entry plus guest to RCS fellows and members, free entry to RCS affiliates, medical students and Hunterian Society members (please call to reserve places). Free place for companions accompanying disabled visitors.

Booking is essential on 020 7869 6568 (NGT: 018001 020 7869 6568)

Live speech-to-text for deaf and hard of hearing visitors delivered by STAGETEXT.

If you have missed any of our previous lectures you can download and listen to audio recordings of many of them as well as written transcripts.