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Lunchtime lectures

Tickets: £4. Lectures last approximately 45 minutes with time for questions.
Free entry plus guest to RCS fellows and members, free entry to RCS affiliates, medical students and Hunterian Society members (please call to reserve places). Free place for companions accompanying disabled visitors.
Booking is essential on 020 7869 6568 (NGT: 018001 020 7869 6568)

Live speech-to-text for deaf and hard of hearing visitors delivered by STAGETEXT.

Tuesday 10 February, 1pm
From the Western Front to Afghanistan:  Transforming military medicine for a century
Dr Emily Mayhew and Squadron Leader Edward Spurrier BM FRCS
A historian and a trauma surgeon discuss how the reorganisation of Britain's military medical organisation on the Western Front was so successful that it provided the infrastructure for much of the military medical provision for the century that followed.  


Tuesday 17 March, 1pm
In the Saddle: Horse doctors at war.
Dr Paul Watkins MRCVS
During World War 1, thousands of horses served with the British Army, often under the most dreadful conditions, as exemplified in the film ‘War Horse’; but the service of veterinary surgeons or ‘horse doctors’ has been overlooked. This lecture will consider some of the veterinary aspects of the war, and highlight many of the close workings between the medical and veterinary professions in war.


Tuesday 28 April, 1pm
Royal Operations
Professor Harold Ellis FRCS
Surgeons always enjoy a good surgical story. Few beat stories of operations on Kings and Queens of the past. In this illustrated talk, Professor Harold Ellis will recount some of his favourite “Royal Operations”.


Tuesday 5 May, 1pm
'From Womb to Tomb': Medical Images in Eighteenth Century British Art
Dr Fiona Haslam
The eighteenth century was an age of satire. Gay, Swift, Pope, Fielding and many other writers depicted society with barbed pens. Artists such as Hogarth, Rowlandson and Gillray followed suit in their graphic prints and paintings and the world of medicine did not escape their scrutiny. This lecture shows how medical images offer a glimpse of the medical and social history of the time.


Tuesday 16 June, 1pm
Battlefield Medicine at Waterloo
Mr Michael Crumplin
The Battle of Waterloo was fought on Sunday 18 June 1815. Around 100,000 Allied British, German and Dutch troops were commanded by Arthur Wellesley, the 1st Duke of Wellington. Facing him was the French Armée du Nord of 125,000 committed French soldiers, led by Napoleon Bonaparte. Neither commander in this titanic struggle had ever faced each other in combat. The battle will be explained in stages, highlighting particular medical issues.

 

Tickets: £4. Lectures last approximately 45 minutes with time for questions.
Free entry plus guest to RCS fellows and members, free entry to RCS affiliates, medical students and Hunterian Society members (please call to reserve places). Free place for companions accompanying disabled visitors.
Booking is essential on 020 7869 6568 (NGT: 018001 020 7869 6568)

Live speech-to-text for deaf and hard of hearing visitors delivered by STAGETEXT.

If you have missed any of our previous lectures you can download and listen to audio recordings of many of them as well as written transcripts.