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Home › News › RCS and Surgical Specialty Associations receive NICE accreditation for commissioning guidance

RCS and Surgical Specialty Associations receive NICE accreditation for commissioning guidance

28 March 2013

The Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) and the Surgical Specialty Associations (SSAs) are delighted to have today received official NICE accreditation for the process by which they are developing guidance for commissioners of surgical services.

The College has been funded by the Department of Health’s QIPP Right Care team to support the SSAs to develop 28 pieces of guidance for Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), with more in the pipeline, across a wide range of surgical interventions. Much of the guidance will be launched in June and will be available on both College and Surgical Specialty Association websites.

This project was initiated by Right Care as part of its work to improve services and outcomes for patients and populations – by stimulating collaboration between commissioners who plan and pay for health services, and the clinicians who provide them. The aim of the new guidance is to support CCGs to commission high value surgical care for patients and reduce the ‘postcode lottery’ in the provision of surgical services.

Professor Norman Williams, President of the Royal College of Surgeons, said:

‘Patient safety and high quality care is front and centre of all that we do. Our NICE accredited process for developing commissioning guidance will enable the College and Surgical Specialty Associations to provide advice and support to CCGs on surgical services. The guidance will give CCGs a clear understanding of what cost effective, high quality care should look like and enable us to work with them to drive up the standards of patient care across England.’

Phil DaSilva, National Co-Director for Right Care, said:

‘We were aware of the disquiet and confusion about reports of so-called blanket bans by PCTs on some surgical interventions and of lists of procedures which they wouldn’t fund. This position was not sustainable and we wanted to do something about it, by developing better understanding and a solution that all parties can support. The accreditation of this process by NICE confirms that we are firmly on the right track.’

 

Notes to Editor:

  1. The Royal College of Surgeons of England is committed to enabling surgeons to achieve and maintain the highest standards of surgical practice and patient care. Registered charity number: 212808. For more information please visit www.rcseng.ac.uk.
  2. A fuller explanation of the project can be found in the Right Care Casebook online
  3. For more information, please contact the RCS press office on: