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Associate Member Profiles

Being an associate member of the RCS enables you to join a growing professional community of more than 27,000 members across the UK and internationally. Read about our associate members and their journey in surgery. Find out how you can become an associate member and help to advance surgical care.

Elizabeth Dreher
Elizabeth Dreher, Surgical First Assistant
I joined the Royal College of Surgeons to enhance and develop my role as a surgical assistant by giving me the tools and opportunities to advance my surgical skills. By being part of such a prestigious college, I hope to have a support network of other non-medical assistants who are working in advanced roles within surgery.
Elizabeth Dreher, Surgical First Assistant

Read Elizabeth's Interview

Specialty: Urology

Location: University Hospitals of Derby and Burton

Tell us about your career to-date

I qualified as an Operating Department Practitioner (ODP) in 2006, working in a variety of specialties in surgical and anaesthetic roles. After a few years as a qualified ODP, I began to work predominantly in urology within the surgical role, learning skills in a variety of procedures. In 2014 I applied for a senior position within my department and was successful; this provided me the fortunate opportunity to be in charge of robotic surgery. It was my involvement within this role and my role in urology that allowed me to commence training as a Patient Side Assistant. I attended advanced scrub practitioner courses and the Basic Surgical Skills course and finished my training in December 2019. Since then, I have finally started as a full time Surgical Assistant in urology.

What does an average day look like for you?

My role as a Surgical Assistant incorporates the robotic lead role, so I always have work to do within this role. I am in the research, training and development group for robotics for our trust, which incorporates working on training packages for theatre staff and trainees and how we can develop robotic surgery within our hospital. I also have regular meetings for robotic surgery. I am usually needed in theatre as an assistant on four days a week, predominantly for robotics in urology but this can also be for laparoscopic or open cases.

What do you love about surgery/your job?

As an ODP I always had a preference for surgery, in particular for urology as a specialty. I find the diverse nature of the specialty interesting, with such a wide variety of surgical procedures and approaches incorporating open, endoscopic, laparoscopic and robotics. My job is very rewarding and enjoyable and this is largely down to the excellent team within urology, including the surgeons, anaesthetists and the theatre staff. I am really enthusiastic about robotic surgery and have devoted five years to assisting in the development of robotic surgery within the hospital. We are very fortunate to have fantastic robotic teams for each of our specialties who have helped in our multi-specialty approach to robotics.

What are your three top tips for someone interested in a career in your role?

  1. Develop skills as an experienced scrub practitioner within their chosen specialty, learning the procedures and surgical techniques of the consultants to an in-depth level, prior to considering an advanced role. This allows the scrub practitioner to observe and learn from the various surgical techniques of the surgeons and can benefit the practice of developing advanced skills.
  2. Undertake the appropriate courses, including the Basic Surgical Skills course. I found this to be excellent in providing the foundations of surgical skills and can be undertaken locally in many hospitals. In my case, I also attended several robotic courses which gave me excellent learning opportunities. This was not essential, but I would advise anyone considering this career to pursue courses specific to the surgery/specialty that they will be in, to further advance their knowledge and skills.
  3. Surround yourself with mentors who you have a good working relationship with. They will be instrumental in providing learning opportunities and allowing you to develop advanced clinical skills in an appropriate time frame and manner.

Why did you become a member of the RCS?

I joined the RCS to enhance and develop my role as a Surgical Assistant by giving me opportunities and the tools to advance my surgical skills. By being part of such a prestigious college I hope to have a support network of other non-medical assistants who are working in advanced roles within surgery.

What are your hobbies/interests outside of work?

I enjoy being in the countryside with my husband and daughter, walking in the Peak District or on family bike rides. We enjoy camping in the summer (weather permitting) and exploring new areas. I like to do yoga several times a week, either at a class or at home which helps after busy days in theatre. I have a love of music, and find enormous enjoyment out of playing the piano (for myself only, no performing) and I have played for over 30 years. I also enjoy cooking, reading and watching films.


Bradley Russell
Bradley Russell, Surgical Care Practitioner
As a body that had help devise the curriculum framework to which I was trained, the Royal College of Surgeons was the logical choice for me in supporting surgical care practitioners, especially as surgery is the backbone of the role. I believe they can provide guidance to those who are training or practising as well ensuring standards remain high.
Bradley Russell, Surgical Care Practitioner

Read Bradley's Interview

Specialty: Urological Oncology

Location: The Royal Marsden Hospital Trust


Tell us about your career to-date

I had my ‘eureka moment’ whilst on theatre placement in my first year of nurse training. I shadowed a cardiac Surgical Care Practitioner (SCP) and immediately knew this was the career I wished to aspire to! After qualifying, I went straight into scrub nursing and during my first two years I was able to complete my adult nursing MSc. I began my surgical first assistant training shortly thereafter and with the purchase of a second surgical robot, a permanent patient side assistant was sought by the urology team. I was recruited as a Urological Trainee SCP and completed the two year MSc programme at Anglia Ruskin University in March 2018.

What does an average day look like for you?

No two days are the same. My job consists of 75% theatre work with a mixture of robotic, laparoscopic and open surgery for five urology consultants. As we have dual console robots, I am able to patient side assist whilst the junior surgeon is being trained by the consultant. Likewise, I can support a senior trainee at the operating table so that the consultant can remain un-scrubbed. I run my own urodynamic clinic with the help of a healthcare assistant and hold regular pre-robotic prostatectomy schools for patients who are scheduled to undergo a robotic assistant laparoscopic prostatectomy. Any non-clinical time is taken up with audit, research and teaching.

What do you love about surgery/your job?

In my opinion, teamwork is the pinnacle of good surgical care and I have always been inspired by the coming together of specialists to provide dedicated treatment for a patient as one in the operating theatre. Working alongside senior trainee surgeons continues to provide a mutual opportunity for learning; I support them where needed and they reciprocate with guidance on certain steps of a procedure that I may perform for my continued leaning and development. Our extended surgical care team also consists of experienced advanced nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists who are valued colleagues and who I often work alongside outside of the theatre environment.

What are your three top tips for someone interested in a career in your role?

1. Be enthusiastic and driven. If you and a consultant have identified a need for an SCP role then you will have to persevere in developing this and taking it forward, often incorporating business managers, senior clinicians and team leaders.
2. Support. Make sure the correct support structure is in place for your learning – a dedicated consultant surgeon and an educational mentor is imperative. These will be invaluable as advocates and therefore must have a solid understanding of your training requirements.
3. Job plan. This needs to cover not only your two years of training but also what is to be expected of you once you are qualified. Ensure this marries up with your job description.

Why did you become a member of the RCS?

As a body that had help devise the curriculum framework to which I was trained, the RCS was the logical choice for me in supporting SCPs, especially as surgery is the backbone of the role. I believe they can provide guidance to those who are training or practising, as well ensuring standards remain high. Continuing professional development was a concern for myself as currently there is very little available. Geographically I am London based, so being within easy reach of the College meant attending any events would be convenient for me.

What are your hobbies/interests outside of work?

As a father to a young family, having free time is scarce! However, I’ve been a season ticket holder at Harlequins (rugby union) for many years and enjoy attending regular home fixtures.


Angela Windle
Angela Windle, Advanced Clinical Practitioner
I am keen to ensure that advanced clinical practitioners are part of the whole surgical care team and the work being undertaken to accredit ACPs within the college is very exciting. I am currently doing an e-learning package that the Royal College of Surgeons offer to support my clinical experience in the care of colorectal cancer patients. The access to educational resources for myself and my team has been one of my main reasons to join the RCS.
Angela Windle, Advanced Clinical Practitioner

Read Angela's Interview

Specialty: Colorectal Surgery

Location: St James’s University Hospital, Leeds

Tell us about your career to-date

I am a nurse by background who trained at Westminster Hospital, London 1987-1990. I began my working life as a staff nurse on a surgical ward at Westminster Hospital and I have worked in intensive care units throughout London before relocating to Yorkshire in 1999. In Yorkshire I have worked in paediatric intensive care in a children’s hospice as a Clinical Skills Teacher for medical students, as a Critical Care Outreach Sister and then trained as an Advanced Clinical Practitioner (ACP) in general surgery.
I have undertaken academic studies to support my varied clinical experience and possess a BSc in biological sciences, a MSc in nursing, a postgraduate diploma in advancing professional practice, as well as a postgraduate certificate in medical education.
I currently work as an ACP in the colorectal department at St James’s University Hospital Leeds as part of the expanding surgical care team.

What does an average day look like for you?

I cover the elective colorectal surgical patients at SJUH, this role involves completing a ward round with the surgical trainees or consultants and then I manage the care of the surgical patients throughout the day. I also spend one day per week supporting the development of the trainee ACPs with their workplace-based assessment and organise the teaching for the foundation year doctors whilst they are on rotation.
Our new role in general surgery also requires constant service development as we are expanding, so I help manage the recruitment of new ACPs and the expansion of our involvement into acute care and develop the role of the ACP with independent clinic review of surgical patients alongside our surgical colleagues.

What do you love about surgery/your job?

Being a surgical ACP is the hardest and most rewarding job I have ever done. The ward environment can be very challenging but the holistic, continuity of care that an ACP brings to the surgical team is highly valued. Working in surgery means you have the chance to be part of a team that can change a patient’s quality of life. You enter a journey from diagnosis to discharge with the patient and their family, which is very rewarding. As an experienced practitioner, I can be the steering force through difficult times in the busy, stressful healthcare environment and supporting my colleagues throughout the whole surgical care team is a privilege.

What are your three top tips for someone interested in a career in your role?

  1. To become a surgical ACP, you need to build a significant volume of clinical experience in a variety of different settings, both surgical and medical experience and this experience will help you manage the complexity of the surgical patient’s conditions.
  2. Be prepared to study outside of your working hours and keep going when the study seems overwhelming.
  3. Get involved in your organisation’s project work to see beyond the narrow spectrum of the ward/clinic/department. There are lots of opportunities to learn quality improvement and service development – just be proactive. You will meet other members of the hospital team who have the same goal but different aspects to the package of care delivered to the patient, from managers to administrative staff. It is important to learn about the different systems within a complex organisation.

Why did you become a member of the RCS?

I am keen to ensure that ACPs are part of the whole surgical care team and the work being undertaken to accredit ACPs within the college is very exciting. I am currently doing an e-learning package that the RCS offers to support my clinical experience in the care of colorectal cancer patients. The access to educational resources for myself and my team has been one of my main reasons to join the RCS.

What are your hobbies/interests outside of work?

I have four children, a husband and a dog and that is work enough. My current focus outside of work is to help these four young people on the journey to becoming lovely, happy, well-adjusted adults. So far it is working!


Donna Hoban, Advanced Nurse Practitioner
I became a member of the RCS as I see this fantastic opportunity to become part of a wider surgical network. As founding members, our views and opinions can help shape the future for ourselves and our colleagues. It also provides access to online learning materials, up-to-date information regarding new surgical innovations and changes to practice. Also not forgetting discounts on courses which is highly beneficial in developing my role and enhancing my practice.
Donna Hoban, Advanced Nurse Practitioner

Read Donna's Interview

Specialty: Emergency General Surgery

Location: Aintree University Hospital


Tell us about your career to-date

I started my career as an Emergency Department Staff Nurse in 1999, after spending five years in the department, I joined the hospital at night team at Aintree University Hospital as a Nurse Clinician. I covered both medicine and surgery out of hours. Due to my keen interest in emergency surgery, I successfully obtained the post of trainee Advanced Nurse Practitioner (ANP) in the emergency surgical unit and am currently in the process of completing my masters in advanced clinical practice.

What does an average day look like for you?

The surgical handover starts the day, whereby all the acute take admissions are discussed. I help to coordinate the EGSU and on call team to ensure all the outlying and new admissions are reviewed and plans are implemented, which includes actively participating in the morning ward round. I am on a bleep system for the ward to review acutely ill patients and also accept general practitioner admissions on the surgical assessment unit.

What do you love about surgery/your job?

Every day is different and I am lucky enough to be a part of a wonderful surgical team who have helped me shape and develop my role, this has been so important as I am currently the first ANP within the unit.
My role has become firmly established from the ward and assessment unit perspective, and I now have the opportunity to develop the role further with full support of my consultants to enable me to assist in theatre. This is an amazing opportunity for me which will ensure that I am completely utilised within my capabilities and will be a fully integrated member of the surgical team.


What are your three top tips for someone interested in a career in your role?

I found it beneficial to do shadow shifts within different surgical specialities, observed in theatre as much as I could. I also obtained funding for a clinical examination and diagnostics course prior to applying for my full masters. Ask lots of questions, make yourself known to the surgical team!

Why did you become a member of the RCS?

I became a member of the RCS as I see this fantastic opportunity to become part of a wider surgical network. As founding members, our views and opinions can help shape the future for ourselves and our colleagues. It also provides access to online learning materials, up-to-date information regarding new surgical innovations and changes to practice. Also, not forgetting discounts on courses which is highly beneficial in developing my role and enhancing my practice.

What are your hobbies/interests outside of work?

Outside work I have organised team events to raise money for charities such as, the Tough Mudder obstacle course, the dreaded Three Peaks Challenge and the Northwest Territorial Army challenge, which incidentally involved getting my clinical director to compete while dressed in a pink tutu! I am also a mother of three lovely children with a very supportive, long-suffering husband!

Taya Azizi image
Taya Azizi, Deputy Theatre Lead
I wanted membership of somewhere that supported and encouraged specialist practitioners, and also to have the appropriate accreditation and representation to more accurately reflect practitioners with advanced professional and surgical skills. I felt it was important to have relevant education and training that was at a level I could build and improve on, and to hopefully pioneer new opportunities for specialist practitioners and women in surgery.
Taya Azizi, Deputy Theatre Lead

Read Taya's Interview

Location: South West

Tell us about your career-to-date

After initially starting out as a forensic science postgraduate, I was lucky enough to be second from my local hospital to do my operating department practitioner training in the south-east. This opportunity allowed me to become one of the first cohorts to incorporate assisting with surgical intervention and more advanced clinical skills into a degree programme. Following on from this, I have had more advanced surgical skills training with the RCS. Post qualification, I have had the opportunity to work in anaesthetics, recovery and surgery but felt my passion was notably in the latter and surgical assisting. My surgical experience has mostly been in vascular and general surgery including, upper gastrointestinal/bariatrics and colorectal surgery, but I also have significant experience in urology and gynaecological surgery. As a Surgical First Assistant, I have worked under the general, gynaecological, urology and orthopaedic specialties.

I have had a number of roles within the Association for Perioperative Practice starting as their first Young Person Advisor to the board, and moving onto working as their Specialist Interest Group Lead for students and then part of the south-west regional team. In both roles, I have been involved in organising and presenting at educational events for AfPP members. I have also had link practitioner roles in manual handling, infection control and resuscitation; being involved in teaching and audit training for theatre staff in these areas. I have also been invited as a sessional tutor and speaker at universities running the ODP programme, which has enabled me to integrate and keep up to date with the future of our professional community.

Currently, I am a Surgical First Assistant and have worked at several hospitals in the region to maintain my skillset as both a scrub practitioner and surgical first assistant.

What does an average day look like for you?

This varies depending on the role and area I am working in on any given day. If I am scrubbing for a list, it will involve getting theatre, equipment and instruments ready for each case depending on the consultant surgeons’ preference. As a Surgical First Assistant, I start by gathering any imaging that may be required for the case, introducing myself to patients pre-operatively regarding the procedure, inspection of the operation site, answering any questions patients may have and discussing my role and involvement in their care ie: catheterisation, positioning for surgery etc. Depending on what list I am doing, I may do camera holding for laparoscopic surgery, skin closure at the end of the surgery and a range of other advanced skills to support the consultant surgeon. 

What do you love about surgery/your job?

Surgical physiology has always been of great interest to me. You can get many cases that are listed the same, but each and every one can still be so different. Being a part of a team that has the knowledge and expertise to care for patients and have some input to be able to fix complex problems is incredibly rewarding.
I love that we are helping people, trying to improve their quality of life and that we have the opportunity to make a difference to their care in hospital. Working with such a vast array of professionals in one setting is amazing. Seeing good cohesion of a theatre team and getting through a tough day together in these very difficult times for healthcare is really worth it.

What are your three top tips for someone interested in a career in your role?

  1. Make sure you have the professional knowledge and training behind you to do specialist roles. Never do something you shouldn’t. Protect yourself and the registration that you work so hard to get.
  2. Be patient; some opportunities will come to you at the right time. Don’t try to fly before you can walk. Experience comes with years, not weeks or even months. You will learn new things every day.
  3. Be prepared to work hard. Having respect and positivity for your job, colleagues and patients is so important in theatre work. 

Why did you become a member of the RCS?

I wanted membership of somewhere that supported and encouraged specialist practitioners, and also to have the appropriate accreditation and representation to more accurately reflect practitioners with advanced professional and surgical skills. I felt it was important to have relevant education and training that was at a level I could build and improve on, and to hopefully pioneer new opportunities for specialist practitioners and women in surgery.
I think the future direction of the RCS in relation to identifying, accrediting and supporting practitioners with surgical assisting skills could be very exciting and I wanted to be a part of it.

What are your hobbies/interests outside of work?

I love reading and writing, going for walks with my dog, cooking, baking, playing board games and seeing new places. I started travelling much later in life than I would have liked. I have very little time for television and instead prefer interacting with people I care about and seeing more of our very beautiful world.

Carolina Britton, Lead Surgical Care Practitioner
I joined the RCS to keep up to date with the development of surgery and of the roles within. To increase my sense of belonging to the surgical community and to be able to direct others who are more junior to the support it can offer. To have a chance to shape the policies and the values that will influence today's and tomorrow's workforce in the surgical care of patients. 
Carolina Britton, Lead Surgical Care Practitioner

Read Carolina's Interview

Specialty: Cardiothoracics

Location: Cambridge

Tell us about your career to-date

My journey in cardiothoracics began as a theatre nurse in Lisbon in 2004, specialising in congenital heart surgery and lung transplant. After six years, I felt that I could no longer progress my career in Portugal and accepted a role at the Brompton in London where I worked as a scrub nurse and was invited to participate in Chain of Hope missions abroad.

In 2013 I began training as a surgical care practitioner (SCP) and performing daily perioperative care of patients independently within the surgical care team. I returned to university, whereby I obtained the PgDip SCP in cardiothoracics and the MCs in Advanced Clinical Practice.

In May 2016 I was offered the role of lead SCP and enrolled in and completed with distinction the MEd in surgical education at the Imperial College London, having researched SCP professional identity formation.

In December 2018 I started working for Cambridge University Hospital as the Education Lead for theatres and perioperative services and became associate editor of the Journal of Perioperative Practice. Since then I practise as an SCP in cardiothoracics and other specialties as ad-hoc to my principal role. I am however, more than ever, interested in participating and helping influence policy pertaining to SCPs in the UK. 

What does an average day look like for you?

In my current role, an average day includes meeting with several others of the wider leadership team and education officers, developing an educational framework and delivering teaching and orientation sessions to groups in different job roles, such as surgical first assistants, scrub nurses, anaesthetic practitioners, theatre support workers, etc.

In the (not so average) days in which I work as an SCP, I join the surgical team for a whole day list (normally two cardiac cases) and perform my duties as a senior SCP in the intra-operative setting (including endoscopic harvesting of conduits for bypass surgery, first and second assisting, closure and dressing of wounds, escorting patients to post-op recovery etc.). I participate in the WHO checklists and place a high value in debriefs at the end of surgical lists. I sometimes write post-op notes and access patients in wards when required.

What do you love about surgery/your job?

As a nurse by background, I love the feeling of belonging that comes with working so close to and alongside surgeons and anaesthetists. I love that I am constantly on the receiving end of the knowledge and expert performance they deliver, while my own contributions are highly valued. That reciprocity, making me feel both proud and humble makes me love surgery and being an SCP.

I have recently watched Netflix’s ‘StarTrek’ series and kept thinking how much ‘the bridge’ (with the captain, the number one and all the navigation and tech specialists) resembled a high-performance surgical team. I don’t think there is a role that I particularly identify with in this analogy, but it is this effective and dedicated work as a team that I am passionate about in surgery. In surgery, teams do not navigate space and time to save all lives, but they are protagonists working collaboratively to control many elements to help one patient at a time and at one decisive moment, that can constitute the climax of the narrative of their health and well-being.

What are your three top tips for someone interested in a career in your role?

  1. Discover if and why you are passionate about surgery.
  2. Do not take yourself too seriously and be prepared to feel anxious, uncertain and challenged but above all else, keep being curious.
  3. Study your patients and study your surgeons, prepare to dedicate yourself to both and to become a bridge in between.

Why did you become a member of the RCS?

To keep up to date with the development of surgery and of the roles within. To increase my sense of belonging to the surgical community and to be able to direct others who are more junior to the support it can offer. To have a chance to shape the policies and the values that will influence today’s and tomorrow’s workforce in the surgical care of patients. 

What are your hobbies/interests outside of work?

Travel, literature and rock climbing.

Clinton John
Clinton John, Surgical First Assistant
Becoming an RCS member has provided me with a professional community and network to tap into... it was too good of an opportunity to miss. It is an opportunity to have input with shaping the future for surgical assistants.
Clinton John, Surgical First Assistant

Read Clinton's interview

Specialty: Trauma and Orthopaedics (Limb and Spine) and Upper GI

Location: London

Tell us about your career to-date

Upon leaving school, I immediately joined Her Majesty’s Royal Marines Commandos, but realised that I was not quite suited to ‘a life on the ocean waves’.

I started my healthcare career as a theatre porter before applying for my healthcare assistant training (level two). I subsequently applied for operating department practitioner training and qualified in 2002.

I successfully completed the Advanced Scrub Practitioner course at Greenwich University in 2003.

I am currently the Head of Clinical Education at University College London Hospital’s NHS Foundation Trust and am responsible for overseeing clinical education across the trust.

I am also the education lead on the Trust’s Human Factors Strategy Group and am actively involved in reviewing and testing systems and pathways.

I have recently completed an MSc in medical and healthcare simulation (with distinction) which has driven my interest in using simulation as a modality to identify latent threats in systems, processes and pathways.

Subsequently, I have enrolled on an MSc to study human factors / ergonomics for patient safety at Loughborough University.

What does an average day look like for you?

My working week varies from day-to-day.

The Head of Clinical Education role can see me facilitating non-technical skills training to a multi-disciplinary group of varying seniority; teaching surgical (robotic) skills, to consultants wishing to embark on the robotics training pathway, to attending executive level meetings, to discuss strategic priorities and objectives.

Clinically, I assist with trauma and orthopaedic cases and have started training in upper GI surgery.

The final strand of work that I am involved with is reviewing serious incidents, with a view to understand mental models and frames in addition to utilising a systems approach to ascertain information that will be used to inform design and delivery of workable interventions, educational or otherwise such as policies and guidelines.

What do you love about surgery/your job?

What isn’t there to love about surgery? 

The challenge and meticulousness of surgery (as professor would say, 'we do it nicely, we do slowly and we do it once'), working within a complex and high-pressured environment, the comradery of working within a team, knowing that you have improved a patients quality of life, teaching junior doctors and consultants on occasion and finally, knowing that no two days are ever going to be the same.

What are your three top tips for someone interested in a career in your role?

  1. Talk to trainee and qualified surgical assistants; ask questions as the role is not for everyone.
  2. Ensure there is the support and infrastructure in place academically, clinically and remedially.
  3. The confidence to get out there and to investigate and absorb as much of the surgical world as possible, it is invaluable exposure and everyone does it differently.

Why did you become a member of the RCS?

I have long felt that surgical assistants have been community-less since the National Association of Assistants in surgical practice was disbanded. Becoming a RCS member has provided me with a professional community and network to tap into.

Being a member has also provided me with access to a wealth of surgical literature and topical issues I was otherwise completely unaware of. The RCSs Political Update being a favourite of mine!

Finally, becoming a member was too good of an opportunity to miss. It is an opportunity to have input with shaping the future for surgical assistants.

What are your hobbies/interests outside of work?

My main hobby and the one that keeps me predominantly occupied, is my home-made gym (in my garage). I can happily spend two - three hours in there with my two children (three and five years old) who are a constant source of entertainment whilst collectively working out; more dancing to the music than lifting weights!

I also have an eclectic taste in music and regularly construct playlists for specific operating lists. Definitely, The Who, The Rolling Stones and a little Motown for T&O.

Reading the literature on topical issues provides good material for discussion over the operating table which often prompts a review of our current surgical practices.

Finally all things DIY are always welcome, which must be the unconscious T&O bias in me!

 

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