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Recover more quickly

Get Well Soon

Helping you make a speedy recovery after removal of wisdom teeth

Things that will help you recover more quickly

Good oral hygiene

It is very important that you maintain good oral hygiene and brush your teeth as usual as best you can, gradually brushing nearer the wound day by day, eventually brushing away the stitches after several days. You may be recommended to use an antimicrobial mouthwash, and often you will be prescribed salt-water rinses to help with wound healing; do this gently on the first postoperative day to avoid dislodging the clots that will have formed over the wounds. Gentle rinsing will also help keep the extraction site free from food debris.

Eat healthily

Avoid food and drink altogether for the first 6 hours or so after the operation.

Fresh fruit and vegetables will help to ensure that your body has all of the nutrients it needs to heal. This is important even though you may not feel like eating. Eat soft or liquid foods for the first few days and once you get onto more solid foods, chew with your other teeth for the first few days. Avoid alcohol and very hot drinks.

Stop smoking

By not smoking – even if it’s just for the time that you’re recovering – you immediately start to improve your circulation and your breathing, not to mention a whole list of other benefits to the heart and lungs. This is a good time to give up, as you often don’t feel like smoking for a week or two after surgery!

Family and friends

Family and friends can give you two important things:

  • Practical help with the tasks you might temporarily be unable to do in the first day or so – such as driving or looking after dependants.
  • Keeping your spirits up!

Keep a routine

Get up at your normal time in the morning, get dressed, move about the house. If you get tired, you can rest later.

Build up gradually

Have a go at doing some of the things you’d normally do, but build up gradually. If you feel tired or are in pain, you have probably just overdone things a little, so slow down. If you are concerned, call NHS Direct, or consult your dentist or surgeon.

 


Pain relief
Once the local anaesthetic starts to wear off, start to take your painkillers – take these as prescribed to maximise your first night’s sleep after surgery.

 

Get Well Soon

Helping you make a speedy recovery after removal of wisdom teeth

Things that will help you recover more quickly

Good oral hygiene

It is very important that you maintain good oral hygiene and brush your teeth as usual as best you can, gradually brushing nearer the wound day by day, eventually brushing away the stitches after several days. You may be recommended to use an antimicrobial mouthwash, and often you will be prescribed salt-water rinses to help with wound healing; do this gently on the first postoperative day to avoid dislodging the clots that will have formed over the wounds. Gentle rinsing will also help keep the extraction site free from food debris.

Eat healthily

Avoid food and drink altogether for the first 6 hours or so after the operation.

Fresh fruit and vegetables will help to ensure that your body has all of the nutrients it needs to heal. This is important even though you may not feel like eating. Eat soft or liquid foods for the first few days and once you get onto more solid foods, chew with your other teeth for the first few days. Avoid alcohol and very hot drinks.

Stop smoking

By not smoking – even if it’s just for the time that you’re recovering – you immediately start to improve your circulation and your breathing, not to mention a whole list of other benefits to the heart and lungs. This is a good time to give up, as you often don’t feel like smoking for a week or two after surgery!

Family and friends

Family and friends can give you two important things:

  • Practical help with the tasks you might temporarily be unable to do in the first day or so – such as driving or looking after dependants.
  • Keeping your spirits up!

Keep a routine

Get up at your normal time in the morning, get dressed, move about the house. If you get tired, you can rest later.

Build up gradually

Have a go at doing some of the things you’d normally do, but build up gradually. If you feel tired or are in pain, you have probably just overdone things a little, so slow down. If you are concerned, call NHS Direct, or consult your dentist or surgeon.

Pain relief

Once the local anaesthetic starts to wear off, start to take your painkillers – take these as prescribed to maximise your first night’s sleep after surgery.

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