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70th Anniversary Conference

28 Feb 2017

Join us in celebrating the 70th anniversary of The Faculty of Dental Surgery of Royal College of Surgeons of England. We are proud to present a first-class educational conference, with top-class speakers, looking at innovations and the future of dentistry. Don’t miss this unique opportunity to learn about how dentistry will evolve in the future.

 

Our expert speakers will include

 

Stephen Hancocks – Editor-in-Chief of British Dental Journal

Martyn Cobourne – Professor in Orthodontics, King’s College London Dental Institute

Chris Deery - Professor in Paediatric Dentistry, University of Sheffield

They along with our other world class speakers will cover a selection of topics from new clinical and research innovations, changes in our population, the use of genetics to personalise oral healthcare, changing aspirations and motivation of different generations, impact of social media, evidence-based paediatric dentistry.

What to expect:

Stephen Hancocks – Editor-in-Chief of British Dental Journal

1. The Faculty will be celebrating 70 years this year. Clearly there have been major changes in dentistry over this period. In your opinion, what do you think has been single most important change in dentistry during your career and why?

The introduction of fluoride toothpaste. This has revolutionised dental caries experience and the consequent pattern of disease and concomitant delivery of oral care.

 

2. What do you anticipate will be the biggest change in dentistry that we will experience in the next 20 years (this could be clinical, political or educational)?

Gradual and continuing changes in the way in which oral and dental care is delivered due to the caries free generations requiring less and less ‘traditional’ treatment

3. As someone who has had a highly successful career, what would you advise to someone qualifying as a dental surgeon in 2017?

Diversify and stay positive

 

4. There has already been a lot of interest in the lecture you are due to give at the “Innovations and the future of dentistry” educational day. Give us one key subject that you plan to talk about on the day that you think will spark the most interest or discussion amongst the audience on the day.

Will periodontal disease ‘save’ dentistry as we know it?

 

Martyn Cobourne – Professor in Orthodontics, King’s College London Dental Institute

Lecture: “Stem cells and biologically-based dental therapies for the future”

1. The Faculty will be celebrating 70 years this year. Clearly there have been major changes in dentistry over this period. In your opinion, what do you think has been single most important change in dentistry during your career and why?

As an orthodontist, the development of the acid etch technique and pre-adjusted edgewise appliances has probably been the most important development

 

2. What do you anticipate will be the biggest change in dentistry that we will experience in the next 20 years (this could be clinical, political or educational)?

There is no doubt that digital technology will continue to have a major influence on how dentistry is delivered

3. There has already been a lot of interest in the lecture you are due to give at the “Innovations and the future of dentistry” educational day. Give us one key subject that you plan to talk about on the day that you think will spark the most interest or discussion amongst the audience on the day.

How can a single cell be influenced to differentiate into any number of fundamentally different cell types?

 

Chris Deery - Professor in Paediatric Dentistry, University of Sheffield

Lecture: “Evidence-based paediatric dentistry including the FICTION study”

1. The Faculty will be celebrating 70 years this year. Clearly there have been major changes in dentistry over this period. In your opinion, what do you think has been single most important change in dentistry during your career and why?

The most important change over the time of my practicing career is the rise of evidence based dentistry because this has made us question long standing paradigms and improve the quality of care

 

2. What do you anticipate will be the biggest change in dentistry that we will experience in the next 20 years (this could be clinical, political or educational)?

The IT devices that we will get to help us explain preventive and operative care to our patients.

 

3. As someone who has had a highly successful career, what would you advise to someone qualifying as a dental surgeon in 2017?

Always ask why

 

4. There has already been a lot of interest in the lecture you are due to give at the “Innovations and the future of dentistry” educational day. Give us one key subject that you plan to talk about on the day that you think will spark the most interest or discussion amongst the audience on the day.

Biological caries management, the seal is the deal.

Find out more and Book now

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